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Apache Voices

Apache Voices $ 24.95

Their Stories of Survival as Told to Eve Ball

By Sherry Robinson

In the 1940s and 1950s, long before historians fully accepted oral tradition as a source, Eve Ball (1890-1984) was taking down verbatim the accounts of Apache elders who had survived the army’s campaigns against them in the last century. These oral histories offer new versions--from Warm Springs, Chiricahua, Mescalero, and Lipan Apache--of events previously known only through descriptions left by non-Indians.

A high school and college teacher, Ball moved to Ruidoso, New Mexico, in 1942. Her house on the edge of the Mescalero Apache Reservation was a stopping-off place for Apaches on the dusty walk into town. She quickly realized she was talking to the sons and daughters of Geronimo, Cochise, Victorio, and their warriors. After winning their confidence, Ball would ultimately interview sixty-seven people.

Here is the Apache side of the story as told to Eve Ball. Including accounts of Victorio’s sister Lozen, a warrior and medicine woman who was the only unmarried woman allowed to ride with the men, as well as unflattering portrayals of Geronimo’s actions while under attack, and Mescalero scorn for the horse thief Billy the Kid, this volume represents a significant new source on Apache history and lifeways.

Cochise to Geromino

From Cochise to Geronimo: The Chiricahua Apaches, 1874–1886 $ 24.95

By Edwin R Sweeney

In the decade after the death of their revered chief Cochise in 1874, the Chiricahua Apaches struggled to survive as a people and their relations with the U.S. government further deteriorated. In From Cochise to Geronimo, Edwin R. Sweeney builds on his previous biographies of Chiricahua leaders Cochise and Mangas Coloradas to offer a definitive history of the turbulent period between Cochise’s death and Geronimo’s surrender in 1886.

Sweeney shows that the cataclysmic events of the 1870s and 1880s stemmed in part from seeds of distrust sown by the American military in 1861 and 1863. In 1876 and 1877, the U.S. government proposed moving the Chiricahua’s from their ancestral homelands in New Mexico and Arizona to the San Carlos Reservation. Some made the move, but most refused to go or soon fled the reviled new reservation, viewing the government’s concentration policy as continued U.S. perfidy. Bands under the leadership of Victorio and Geronimo went south into the Sierra Madre of Mexico, a redoubt from which they conducted bloody raids on American soil.

Sweeney draws on American and Mexican archives, some only recently opened, to offer a balanced account of life on and off the reservation in the 1870s and 1880s. From Cochise to Geronimo details the Chiricahua’s’ ordeal in maintaining their identity despite forced relocations, disease epidemics, sustained warfare, and confinement. Resigned to accommodation with Americans but intent on preserving their culture, they were determined to survive as a people.

Victorio

In the Days of Victorio $ 19.95

Recollections of a Warm Springs Apache

By Eve Ball


“Chief Victorio of the Warm Springs Apache has recounted the turbulent life of his people between 1876 and 1886. This eyewitness account…recalls not only the hunger, pursuit, and strife of those years, but also the thoughts, feelings, and culture of the hunted tribe. Recommended as general reading.” – Library Journal

“Shining through every page is the unquenchable spirit that was the Apache. Inured trained, to suffering, Apaches stood strong beside Victorio, Nana, and finally Geronimo in a vain attempt to maintain those things they held more dear than life itself-freedom, homeland, dignity as human beings. A warm and vital people, the Apaches had, and have a great deal to offer.” – Arizona and the West

Victorio, Warrior and Chief

Victorio: Apache Warrior and Chief $ 24.95

By Kathleen P. Chamberlain

A steadfast champion of his people during the wars with encroaching Anglo-Americans, the Apache chief Victorio deserves as much attention as his better-known contemporaries Cochise and Geronimo. In presenting the story of this nineteenth-century Warm Springs Apache warrior, Kathleen P. Chamberlain expands our understanding of Victorio’s role in the Apache wars and brings him into the center of events.

Although there is little documentation of Victorio’s life outside military records, Chamberlain draws on ethnographic sources to surmise his childhood and adolescence and to depict traditional Warm Springs Apache social, religious, and economic life. Reconstructing Victorio’s life beyond the military conflicts that have since come to define him, she interprets his character and actions not only as whites viewed them but also as the logical outcome of his upbringing and worldview.

Chamberlain’s Victorio is a pragmatic leader and a profoundly spiritual man. Caught in the absurdities of post–Civil War Indian policy, Victorio struggled with the glaring disconnect between the U.S. government’s vision for Indians and their own physical, psychological, and spiritual needs.

Graced with historic photos of Victorio, other Apaches, and U.S. military leaders, this biography portrays Victorio as a leader who sought a peaceful homeland for his people in the face of wrongheaded decisions from Washington. It is the most nearly complete and balanced picture yet to emerge of a Native leader caught in the conflicts and compromises of the nineteenth-century Southwest.

Apache Wars

The Apache Wars $ 18.00

The Hunt for Geronimo, The Apache Kid, and the Captive Boy Who Started the Longest War in American History

By Paul Andrew Hutton

The 1861 kidnapping of the boy who would grow up to be Mickey Free – the only man Geronimo ever feared – started the longest war in American History: the brutal struggle between the Apaches and the U.S. government for control of the Southwest. When the Apache Wars finally ended in 1890, the western frontier had closed, and the once powerful Apaches had been imprisoned far to the east or corralled on reservations. This legendary struggle, a sage of blood, power, family and revenge, is filled with remarkable acts of heroism and brutality, brought to life here by one of our great historians of the West. In this critically acclaimed book, Paul Andrew Hutton tells the story of Apache leaders and warriors, the generals and soldiers, the scouts and frontiersmen – all those whose lives shaped the violent history of the deserts and mountains of the southwestern borderlands. This bleak and unforgiving world would serve as a backdrop for a long, unforgettable last stand: one that would enshrine Geronimo in legend and bring to an end the now mythic, wild days of the American West.

Navajo Scouts

Navajo Scouts during the Apache Wars $ 21.99

By John Lewis Taylor

In January 1873, Secretary of War William W. Belknap authorized the Military District of New Mexico to enlist fifty Indian scouts for campaigns against the Apaches and other tribes. In an overwhelming response, many more Navajos came to Fort Wingate to enlist than the ten requested. Why, so soon after the Navajo War, the Long Walk and imprisonment at Fort Sumner, would young Navajos volunteer to join the United States military? Author John Lewis Taylor explores this question and the relationship between the Navajo Nation and the United States military in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Apache Legends and Lore

Apache Legends and Lore of Southern New Mexico: From the Sacred Mountain

$ 19.99

By Lynda A. Sánchez

Storytelling has been a vital and vivid tradition in Apache life. Coyote tales, the creation legend and stories of historic battles with Comanche and Anglo intruders create a colorful mosaic of tribal heritage. Percy Bigmouth, a prominent oral historian of the Mescalero and Lipan Apache tribes, realized in the early twentieth century that the old ways were waning. He wrote in longhand what he had learned from his father, Scout Bigmouth, a prison camp survivor at Fort Sumner and participant in the turbulent Apache Wars. Join author Lynda Sanchez as she brings to light the ancient legends and lore of the Apaches living in the shadow of Mescalero’s Sacred Mountain. Seventy-five years in the making, this collection is a loving tribute to a way of life nearly lost to history.

Jicarilla Apache

The Jicarilla Apache of Dulce $ 21.99

By Veronica E. Velarde Tiller PhD and Mary M. Velarde

Now the headquarters of the Jicarilla Apache, Dulce (meaning "sweet" in Spanish) was named by the impoverished and relocated Indians who associated the place with the sugar and candy that came with government-supplied rations. Since the establishment of the reservation in 1887, Dulce has become the hub of everything associated with the Jicarillas. From the early timber operations, farming, and livestock raising, the Jicarilla Apache have become an economic powerhouse of northern New Mexico. Dulce is now a community living in two worlds, fully immersed in the American mainstream economy with a world-class hunting lodge, significant oil and gas operations, and widely diversified investments while fiercely maintaining the centuries-old language, culture, religion, and ceremonies of Jicarilla Apache Indians.

Apache Mothers and Daughters

Apache Mothers and Daughters $ 19.95

By Ruth McDonald Boyer and Narcissus Duffy Gayton

Apache Mothers and Daughters, an illustrated family history of four generations of Chiricahua Apache women from 1848 to the present, is an eloquent testimonial to the strength and the stamina of Apache women. Over the course of thirty-five years, anthropologist Ruth McDonald Boyer collected the remembrances of Narcissus Duffy Gayton, great-great-granddaughter of the Apache chief Victorio. This intimate record of Apache life, told from an Apache perspective, highlights the key roles women play in tribal life.

The story begins with Dilth-cheyhen, Victorio’s daughter, whose life encompassed much of the traditional cultures of the Tchi-hèné band of the Chiricahua Apaches. Her daughter, Beshád-e, was just sixteen in 1886 when the twenty-seven-year incarceration of the Chiricahuas began. Beshád-e and her family were forced to move to Florida, Alabama, Oklahoma, and then New Mexico, where the Mescalero Apaches remain today. When Beshád-e’s daughter Christine died of tuberculosis in her twenties, she left her daughter Narcissus in Beshád-e’s care. After struggling to complete her education, Narcissus returned to serve her tribe as a registered nurse and an advocate for health care.


This account documents rituals such as the puberty rite and the cradle-making ceremony, the importance of religion (traditional as well as Anglo) in Apache life, and the intense bond between Apache mothers and daughters.

Apache Eagles

The Apaches: Eagles of the Southwest $24.95

By Donald E. Worchester

Until now Apache history has been fragmented, offered in books dealing with specific bands or groups-the Mescaleros, Mimbreños, Chiricahuas, and the more distant Kiowa Apaches, Lipans, and Jicarillas. In this book, Donald E. Worcester synthesizes the total historical experience of the Apaches, from the post-Conquest Spanish era to the late twentieth century. In clear, fluent prose he focuses primarily on the nineteenth century, the era of the Apaches’ sometimes splintered but always determined resistance to the white intruders. They were never a numerous tribe, but, in their daring and skill as commando-like raiders, they well deserved the name "Eagles of the Southwest."

The book highlights the many defensive stands and the brilliant assaults the Apaches made on their enemies. The only effective strategy against them was to divide and conquer, and the Spaniards (and after them the Anglo-Americans) employed it extensively, using renegade Indians as scouts, feeding traveling bands, and trading with them at their presidios and missions. When the Mexican Revolution disrupted this pattern in 1810, the Apaches again turned to raiding, and the Apache wars that erupted with the arrival of the Anglo-Americans constitute some of the most sensational chapters in America’s military annals.

The author describes the Apaches’ life today on the Arizona and New Mexico reservations, where they manage to preserve some of the traditional ceremonies, while trying to provide livelihoods for all their people. The Apaches still have a proud history in their struggles against overwhelming odds of numbers and weaponry. Worcester here re-creates that history in all its color and drama

Chief Loco

Chief Loco $34.95

Apache Peacemaker

By Bud Shapard

Winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award in the multi-cultural category

Jlin-tay-i-tith, better known as Loco, was the only Apache leader to make a lasting peace with both Americans and Mexicans. Yet most historians have ignored his efforts, and some Chiricahua descendants have branded him as fainthearted despite his well-known valor in combat. In this engaging biography, Bud Shapard tells the story of this important but overlooked chief against the backdrop of the harrowing Apache wars and eventual removal of the tribe from its homeland to prison camps in Florida, Alabama, and Oklahoma.

Tracing the events of Loco’s long tenure as a leader of the Warm Springs Chiricahua band, Shapard tells how Loco steered his followers along a treacherous path of unforeseeable circumstances and tragic developments in the mid-to-late 1800s. While recognizing the near-impossibility of Apache-American coexistence, Loco persevered in his quest for peace against frustrating odds and often treacherous U.S. government policy. Even as Geronimo, Naiche, and others continued their raiding and sought to undermine Loco’s efforts, this visionary chief, motivated by his love for children, maintained his commitment to keep Apache families safe from wartime dangers.

Based on extensive research, including interviews with Loco’s grandsons and other descendants, Shapard’s biography is an important counterview for historians and buffs interested in Apache history and a moving account of a leader ahead of his time.

Mangas Coloradas

Mangas Coloradas: Chief of the Chiricahua Apaches $ 32.95

By Edwin R. Sweeney

Spur Award, Best Western Nonfiction, Biography, (Finalist), Western Writers of America

Mangas Coloradas led his Chiricahua Apache people for almost forty years. During the last years of Mangas’s life, he and his son-in-law Cochise led an assault against white settlement in Apachería that made the two of them the most feared warriors in the Southwest. In this first full-length biography of the legendary chief, Edwin R. Sweeney vividly portrays the Apache culture in which Mangas rose to power and the conflict with Americans that led to his brutal death.

A giant of a man, Mangas combined strength with wisdom and became leader of the Chiricahuas by 1842. Leading war parties against the Mexicans of Sonora, Mangas returned to his homelands in southwestern New Mexico with livestock, booty, and captives. In 1846 he welcomed Americans who joined in his fight against the Mexicans. But as more white miners, ranchers, and farmers encroached on the Apaches’ territory, tragic incidents caused retaliations that pressured Mangas, along with Cochise, to fight back in desperation. When Mangas finally tried to make peace in 1863, he was captured and killed by American soldiers. Ironically, the death of Mangas Coloradas, who had wished only to live in peace in his land, inflamed American-Apache relations and led to another twenty-three years of war.

Cochise

Cochise - Chiricahua Apache Chief $24.95

By Edwin R. Sweeney

When it acquired New Mexico and Arizona, the United States inherited the territory of a people who had been a thorn in side of Mexico since 1821 and Spain before that. Known collectively as Apaches, these Indians lived in diverse, widely scattered groups with many names—Mescaleros, Chiricahuas, and Jicarillas, to name but three. Much has been written about them and their leaders, such as Geronimo, Juh, Nana, Victorio, and Mangas Coloradas, but no one wrote extensively about the greatest leader of them all: Cochise. Now, however, Edwin R. Sweeney has remedied this deficiency with his definitive biography.

Cochise, a Chiricahua, was said to be the most resourceful, most brutal, most feared Apache. He and his warriors raided in both Mexico and the United States, crossing the border both ways to obtain sanctuary after raids for cattle, horses, and other livestock. Once only he was captured and imprisoned; on the day he was freed he vowed never to be taken again. From that day he gave no quarter and asked none. Always at the head of his warriors in battle, he led a charmed life, being wounded several times but always surviving.

In 1861, when his brother was executed by Americans at Apache Pass, Cochise declared war. He fought relentlessly for a decade, and then only in the face of overwhelming military superiority did he agree to a peace and accept the reservation. Nevertheless, even though he was blamed for virtually every subsequent Apache depredation in Arizona and New Mexico, he faithfully kept that peace until his death in 1874.

Geromino

Geronimo: The True Story of America’s Most Ferocious Warrior $ 12.95

By S.M. Barrett

First published in 1906, Geronimo is the collaborative work between Geronimo, chief of the Chiricahua Apache, and author S. M. Barrett. The latter was given special permission from President Theodore Roosevelt to interview Geronimo while he was a prisoner of war at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. What Barrett recorded is a blunt, firsthand account of the twenty-five years Geronimo spent fighting the U.S. government.

In Geronimo, the famous Native American discusses the history of the Apache people—where they came from, their early life, and their tribal customs and manners. Geronimo expresses his personal views on how the white men who settled in the West negatively affected his tribe, from wrongs done to his people and removal from their homeland to Geronimo’s imprisonment and forced surrender.

“I am thankful that the President of the United States has given me permission to tell my story. I hope that he and those in authority under him will read my story and judge whether my people have been rightly treated.” —Geronimo

This is the perfect book for anyone interested in the history of America and its native peoples, and this true-life account—from one of the most well-known figures in our country’s history—is both thrilling and sobering.

Geronimo Autobiography

Geronimo - His Own Story: the Autobiography of a Great Patriot Warrior $15.00

As told to S.M. Barrett, newly revised and edited by Frederick Turner

“I am thankful that the President of the United States has given me permission to tell my story. I hope that he and those in authority under him will read my story and judge whether my people have been rightly treated.”—Geronimo

This book contains one of the most extraordinary and invaluable documents in the annals of Native American history—the authentic testament of a remarkable “war shaman” who for several years held off both Mexico and the United States in fierce defense of Apache lands. During 1905 and 1906, Geronimo, the legendary Apache warrior and honorary war chief, dictated his story through a native interpreter to S.M. Barrett, then superintendent of schools in Lawton, Oklahoma. As Geronimo was by then a prisoner of war, Barrett had made appeals all the way up the chain of command to President Teddy Roosevelt for permission to record the words of the “Indian outlaw.” Geronimo came to each interview knowing exactly what he wanted to cover, beginning with his telling of the Apache creation story. When, at the end of the first session, Barrett posed a question, the only answer he received was a pronouncement—“Write what I have spoken.”

Now Geronimo’s narrative, with S.M. Barrett’s original commentary, has been set in historical perspective by Frederick Turner’s new introduction on the latest scholarship about the period. These elements combine in Geronimo: His Own Story to provide unique insights into the beliefs, customs, and way of life of a remarkable man and his people.

Truth About Geronimo

The Truth About Geronimo $ 19.95

By Britton Davis

Britton Davis’s account of the controversial "Geronimo Campaign" of 1885–86 offers an important firsthand picture of the famous Chiricahua warrior and the men who finally forced his surrender. Davis knew most of the people involved in the campaign and was himself in charge of Indian scouts, some of whom helped hunt down the small band of fugitives Robert M. Utley’s foreword reevaluates the account for the modern reader and establishes its historical background.

Geronimo Leadership

Geronimo $ 16.99

Leadership Strategies of an American Warrior

By Mike Leach and Buddy Levy

 “In the hands of Mike Leach and Buddy Levy, the story of this brilliant Apache leader comes into sharp focus, both in their narrative of his life and in spirited commentaries on its meaning” (S.C. Gwynne, author of Pulitzer Prize finalist Empire of the Summer Moon).

Playing cowboys and Indians as a boy, legendary college football coach Mike Leach always chose to be the Indian—the underdog whose success turned on being a tough, resourceful, ingenious fighter. And the greatest Indian military leader of all was Geronimo, the Apache warrior whose name is so symbolic of courage that World War II paratroopers shouted it as they leaped from airplanes into battle.

Told in the style of Robert Greene’s The 48 Laws of Power, Leach’s compelling and inspiring book examines Geronimo’s leadership approach and the timeless strategies, decisions, and personal qualities that made him a success. Raised in an unforgiving landscape, Geronimo and his band faced enemies better armed, better equipped, and more numerous than they were. But somehow they won victories against all odds, beguiling the United States and Mexican governments and earning the respect and awe of those generals committed to hunting him down. While some believed that Geronimo had supernatural powers, much of his genius can be ascribed to old-fashioned values such as relentless training and preparation, leveraging resources, finding ways to turn defeats into victories, and being faster and more nimble than his enemy. The tactics of Geronimo would be studied and copied by the US military for generations.

Apacheria

Apacheria $ 18.95

True Stories of Apache Life 1860-1920

By W. Michael Farmer

Apacheria includes exciting vignettes of Southwest history describing what it meant to be “Apache” in an era of harsh wars waged against them as a stubborn and valiant foe. It is uniquely illustrated with stunning artwork and historic photos, many of which have never been published in traditional books about the Apache Wars. It also can be considered a valuable tool in presenting the other side of the coin to students of history and cultural anthropology.” Lynda A Sanchez, author and historian

Cochise, Geronimo, Naiche, Crook, Jeffords, Bascom – all are names that resonate throughout the story of the Apache people during the last half of the nineteenth century and the early years of the twentieth. The history of the west is dense with stories of battles waged, won, lost; and cunning strategies in the long culture war between Anglos and Hispanic peoples on one side and the Native Americans on the other that often ended with tragic misunderstandings on both sides. Over the years, as clashes erupted both over territory and the white man’s interference in the traditional lifeways of native peoples, the pressure on the Apache grew, leaving them with a choice between changing their ways or vanishing entirely.

Wrath of Cochise

The Wrath of Cochise $ 15.95

The Bascom Affair and the Origins of the Apache Wars

By Terry Mort

In February 1861, the twelve-year-old son of Arizona rancher John Ward was kidnapped by Apaches. What followed would ignite a Southwestern frontier war between the Chiricahuas and the US Army that would last twenty-five years. In the days following the initial melee, innocent passersby would be taken as hostages on both sides, and almost all of them would be brutally slaughtered. Thousands of lives would be lost, the economies of Arizona and New Mexico would be devastated, and in the end, the Chiricahua way of life would essentially cease to exist. In a gripping narrative that often reads like an old-fashioned Western novel, Terry Mort explores the collision of these two radically different cultures in a masterful account of one of the bloodiest conflicts in our frontier history.

Tom Jeffords

Tom Jeffords $ 16.95

Friend of Cochise

By Doug Hocking

The first full-length biography of the Western legend Tom Jeffords, immortalized by Jimmy Stewart in 1950’s Broken Arrow.
This book tells the true story of a man who headed West drawn by the lure of the Pike’s Peak Gold Rush in 1858; made a life for himself over a decade as he scouted for the army, prospected, became a business man; then learned the Apache language and rode alone into Cochise’s camp in order to negotiate peaceful passage for his stagecoach company. In his search for the real story of Jeffords, Cochise, and the parts they played in mid-nineteenth century American history and politics, author Doug Hocking reveals that while the myths surrounding those events may have clouded the truth a bit, Jeffords was almost as brave and impressive as the legend had it.